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The Center for Mindful Eating

The Center for Mindful Eating

Portsmouth, United States · 88 items

Food for Thought Autumn 2015: Medical Illness: Empower Your Health with Mindful Eating

Food for Thought Autumn 2015 Medical Illness: Empower Your Health with Mindful Eating

Contents

  • Lilia Graue MD: Mindful Eating and Medical Illness
  • Mary Farhi MD: Creating Wellness - Working with Illness through Mindful Eating
  • Marsha Hudnall, MS, RD: Making Peace with Dietary Restrictions
  • Educational Handout: Making Peace with Dietary Restrictions

About the issue

This issue of Food for Thought explores how mindful eating can improve a person’s overall health. It begins by accepting nutrition is far more complex than “good” and “bad” choices. That there are hundreds of invisible, micro-choices, which overtime can have a profoundly positive impact on our health.

Listening to our hearts and to those whom we assist in discovering the joy of mindful eating also requires us to listen to the suffering that hunger and the fear of hunger have caused. It is with this understanding that The Center for Mindful Eating created its fourth position statement, focusing on food security.

The Center for Mindful Eating recognizes that an individual’s past and current food insecurity concerns may promote unhealthy, mindless or fear-based eating. In its report called the Feed America Study, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations says that 46.5 million Americans are turning to food banks to assist with meeting weekly food needs. Half of these individuals are dealing with medical illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension and other conditions that are directly impacted by food and nutrition. Understanding the complex issue of food insecurity is not an easy task. It requires effort and personal courage because the pain of hunger is something all humans can relate to.

Looking globally, the issue of food insecurity may seem overwhelming. In this report, the Food and Agriculture Organization FAO states that 795 million people are undernourished globally. The good news is this number is down 167 million over the last decade, and 216 million less than in 1990–-92.

We invite you to visit our website to learn more about food insecurity in the United States and around the world. The Center for Mindful Eating believes that awareness of the presence of food insecurity is the first step to overcome this global problem.

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